Scoliosis

The earlier the detection and treatment of scoliosis can help to maintain better movement patterns as growth occurs.

Scoliosis

  • Between 3-5 out of 1,000 children will develop scoliosis
  • Approximately half a million adolescents develop some degree of scoliosis every year
  • About 10 times as many girls as boys see their curves progress
  • Girls are more likely to develop severe curves

Four Types of Scoliosis

  • 1.) Congenital – fairly rare malformation of the spine that manifests itself at birth or shortly afterward
  • 2.) Juvenile – relatively unusual; appearing in childhood
  • 3.) Degenerative/adult – cause by the degeneration of joints in the spine later in life
  • 4.) Idiopathic/adolescent – manifests and progresses primarily during the adolescent growth spurt

Causes of Scoliosis

While the causes of idiopathic scoliosis is unknown, there are a few factors that can contribute:

  • Genetics – siblings with idiopathic scoliosis seen in 7% of families. Parents with scoliosis have been seen in 6-14% of families.
  • Multiple factors must be present, such as abnormalities of the musculoskeletal system or the endocrine system.
  • The structural growth of the spine may be faster than the neurological growth.
  • Scoliosis may be the presenting symptom in patients with abnormalities in the central nervous system.
  • Scoliosis may be the presenting symptom in patients with abnormalities in the central nervous system.
    •19.2% of children under 11 years of age had an intraspinal pathology that presented as idiopathic scoliosis.
    •Scoliosis can be seen in up to 85% of cases with serious underlying neurologic conditions, ie. syringomyelia.
  • Possible childhood injury.